Earth Hour 2023 rallies more people than ever

GENEVA, 26th March, 2023 (WAM) – Major landmarks across the world took part in Earth Hour’s iconic switch off moment, including the Sydney Opera House, China's Zhouzhuang in Kunshan and the Beijing National Speed Skating Hall, Taipei 101, the Eiffel Tower, the Empire State Building, and Christ the Redeemer. For the first time in its incredible 17-year history, this year’s Earth Hour also encouraged people around the globe to ‘switch off’ themselves by taking a break from their routine and everyday distractions, and deciding for themselves what they can do to restore our one home.

From 08:30 pm local time on Saturday, 25th of March, WWF’s Earth Hour, the world’s largest grassroots environmental movement, created the ‘Biggest Hour for Earth’ yet, as more individuals, businesses and communities across 190 countries and territories came together in a powerful moment of unity to celebrate the planet and ‘Give an Hour for Earth’, spending 60 minutes doing something positive for our planet.

Dr Kirsten Schuijt, Director General, WWF International: “Earth Hour is a fantastic celebration of people, planet and nature. This year we created the Biggest Hour for Earth yet! , asking everyone to “switch off” - their lights or their daily habits - and spending 60 minutes doing something for the planet instead. Together, we can turn a single Earth Hour into millions of hours of inspiration, inviting millions of people to act, and making millions more take notice. Our one shared home needs our help and we can ALL play a part in protecting it.”


Meanwhile, Mr Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General, the United Nations: “On Earth Hour every year, millions of people in hundreds of cities around the world turn off the lights. It's a call to action to make peace with nature, massively increase climate action and save our planet. And it is a reminder that all of us can play our part in large ways and small, to protect our common home and safeguard our future. Every minute and every hour counts. From the darkness let us build a brighter and more sustainable future for everyone, everywhere.”

·Earth Hour, the world's largest grassroots movement for the environment, returned in 2023 to raise awareness and inspire collective action against climate change and nature loss.

Since 2007 Earth Hour has shone a spotlight on the issues of climate change and nature loss having reached over 190 countries and territories and millions of people around the globe. Earth Hour has featured many of the world’s most iconic landmarks switching off their lights, from the London Eye in England to the Eiffel Tower in France and the 2,000-year-old Colosseum in Italy. It has also united millions around the world to push for change and inspired global initiatives since it first started.